Reflecting on the news…and the games!

This week, I enjoyed creating different resources, including the game and the video, about fake news, and I felt I gained a lot from the resources others had shared.

In William Jones’ blog post, he talked about filter bubbles and evaluated how it might be possible to “pop” these. This was an interesting angle on the discussion and one of the resources I liked the most in this discussion was the comparison of search terms on Google, and how the same term generated different results for different people. William and I then talked about filter bubbles offline, and how they might be even harder to break than ones online. In Luke’s post, he built on this, exploring media literacy, something which I enjoyed as it is often not given the attention it should be, as a skill. We agreed it was hard to teach, and innovative game-based approaches could be leading the way. Indeed, in between my two blog posts on this topic, I came across a BBC news tool for evaluating fake news, which I reflect on below.

 

 

I feel that exploring fake news, or trust online, through the module in this way was really valuable. Everyone could focus on a small section, for example, Will filter bubbles, and myself evaluating news, yet it was very clear that there were meaningful links between the different areas. I was pleased to see others pick up on these links in my own post. I enjoyed discussing with Stefan the difficulties that might surround motivation of people to use sites like FactCheck.org, and whether more general education might be more important.

Reflecting overall, I really enjoyed this topic and felt I learnt a lot. I particularly liked the freedom to choose a different section of trust online, and it made for a diverse exploration of the topic across the whole module. It is clear that it is a tricky beast to overcome, but I am confident it can be done, more so after reading these posts.

Word Count: 330

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